Fantastic Tales: ADVENTURES IN ILLUSTRATED CHILDREN’S BOOKS FROM THE SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DIVISION

Fantastic Tales:
ADVENTURES IN ILLUSTRATED CHILDREN’S BOOKS
FROM THE SPECIAL COLLECTIONS DIVISION
On view
May 15, 2015 – September 5, 2015

Main Library
Second Floor Gallery

EXHIBITION

Caldecott
Randolph Caldecott (English, 1846-1886), colored drawing from A Frog He Would A-Wooing Go (1883).

On the 150th anniversary of the publication of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, The Newark Public Library presents a selection of illustrated children’s books from our Special Collections Division. While there are numerous outstanding titles which fall into the fantasy genre, the works displayed here are magnificent pictorial examples from our holdings.
Newell
Peter Newell (American, 1862-1924), illustration of the Mad Tea Party in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1901 edition).

Literary fantasy encompasses fairy tales, fables, myths, and legends. Prior to the Victorian Age, these types of stories were considered unacceptable for children. The Fables of Aesop, concocted by an illiterate Thracian slave, were among the earliest tales to be printed (1484), only for the reason that they conveyed spiritual and moral lessons to children.
Pinkney
Brian Pinkney (American, born 1961), illustration for Cendrillon: A Caribbean Cinderella (1988),

Illustrated books were costly and the earliest examples were created for nobility. By the mid–19th century, children’s materials began to include illustrations, as to make them more appealing. The first images were woodcuts or drawings rendered in pen or pencil. Afterward, the advancement of printing techniques enabled the affordable production of colorful, vibrant, and fascinating pictures.
Qualls
Sean Qualls (American, born 1969), illustration for Little Cloud and Lady Wind (2010),

The exhibit explores illustrated examples of fairy tales, folklore, animal fables, legends, myths, and 19th and 20th century examples of magical and imaginative stories.

This display gives visitors the opportunity to foster their imagination by exploring enchanted worlds and eccentric creatures while viewing fanciful works of art.

The Newark Public Library is located at 5 Washington Street in downtown Newark’s growing cultural complex. The exhibition is open during regular Library hours, Monday through Saturday, with free admission.